The California Gold Rush of 1849

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It is here in this sleepy valley that the American dream has been redefined. An accidental discovery near the Dark American River would change a young nation forever. The simple life would not be enough. In its place would come a new lifestyle: entrepreneurial, wide open, free. The New American Dream: Getting Rich; make a fortune – quickly.

Instant wealth was there for the taking. All over America young men have made the decision to go to California. Every town, every hamlet would send its brightest, strongest, to California – and eagerly await their triumphant return. They came from Europe, Asia and South America in search of instant riches.

It was one of the greatest adventures the world has ever seen.

In the early 1840s, California was a distant outpost that only a handful of Americans had seen. The sleepy port that would become San Francisco had only a few hundred people.

One of the wealthiest people in the area was John Sutter – an affable Swiss immigrant who came to California in 1839, with the intention of building his own private empire. Sutter soon built a fort, amassed 12,000 head of cattle, and hired hundreds of laborers. Its most prolific harvest was debt. He owed money to creditors as far away as Russia. But Sutter was a man with a dream; a dream of a vast agricultural estate that he would control.

By the mid-1840s, more and more Americans were arriving in California by wagon and boat. Sutter welcomed the newcomers – he saw them as subjects for his self-proclaimed kingdom. But Sutter had no idea the Net would turn into a downpour – a downpour of humanity that would destroy his dream. Sutter's loss began 50 miles northeast of his fort on the American River. In late 1847, James Marshall and about 20 men were sent to the river by Sutter to build a sawmill – to provide timber for Sutter's growing ranch. The sawmill was nearing completion when a glimmer of something caught Marshall's attention. It was January 24, 1848.

James marshall

"I reached down and picked it up; it made my heart beat because I was sure it was gold. The piece was about half the size and shape of a pea. Then I saw another one.

After making the greatest find in Western history, Marshall and the other workers returned to work. But they kept coming across more gold. Still in disbelief, Marshall brought samples back to Sutter & # 39; s Fort. Sutter and Marshall tested the shiny metal the best they could – a tattered encyclopedia gave them clues. It was gold, they concluded – but neither was happy about it.

Sutter was building an agricultural stronghold – he didn't want the competition that gold diggers might bring. And Marshall had a sawmill to build – the Gold Hunters would only get in the way. So they made a pact to keep the discovery a secret.

But it wasn't long before golden stories leaked into the surrounding countryside. Still, there was no race at the American River. Marshall's news of gold was just another fantastic story – too unlikely to be believed.

The Gold Rush needed a booster, and Sam Brannan was the man. A San Francisco merchant, Brannan was a skilled artisan of the hype. Eventually, the gold rush would make him the richest person in California – but Sam Brannan never mined for gold. He had a different plan – a plan he implemented by running through the streets of San Francisco shouting about Marshall's discovery. As proof, Brannan held up a bottle of gold dust. It was a master stroke that would spark the Gold Rush – and make Brannan rich.

Brannan fully understood the laws of supply and demand. His mad dash through San Francisco came right after he bought every pickaxe, pan and shovel in the area. A metal saucepan that sold for twenty cents a few days earlier was now available from Brannan for fifteen dollars. In just nine weeks, he made thirty-six thousand dollars.

By the winter of 1848, whispers of a gold attack had drifted east across the country – but few East believed it. It was a time when rumors were spread – and government officials were revered. The discovery of gold had to be validated, and President James Polk delivered it in early December 1848:

President James Polk:

"The accounts of the abundance of gold in this land are of such an extraordinary character that it would not be believed if they were not corroborated by authentic reports from public service officers.

Polk & # 39; s confirmation has penetrated deep into the souls of millions of people. His simple words were a powerful call to action. The farmers left their fields; the merchants closed their stores; the soldiers left their posts and made plans for California. The newspapers fanned the fires.

Horace Greeley of the New York Tribune:

“Fortune rests on the surface of the earth as abundant as the mud of our streets. We are looking for an addition within the next four years equal to at least one thousand million dollars in outstanding gold.

At the start of 1849, Gold Fever was an epidemic. Talks about gold could be heard at almost every kitchen table across the country. The young men explained to their wives that a year apart was worth it.

Minor Melvin Paden:

"Jane, I let you and these boys get you a little property in the sweat of my brow so that we can have a place of our own – that I am not a dog to others

people more. "

They said goodbye and flocked to the west in unison – thousands of young adventurers with a collective dream – a year of pain in exchange for a rich life. They were nicknamed "Forty-Nine" because they left home in 1849. When they returned it was a whole different matter.

By the middle of 1849, the easy gold was gone – but the 49ers kept coming. There was still gold in the riverbeds, but it was getting harder and harder to find. A typical miner would spend 10 hours a day up to his knees in ice water, digging, sifting, washing. It was backbreaking work that paid off less and less.

As panning became less efficient, miners switched to more advanced techniques for extracting the precious metal. But it was a losing battle as the gold reserves dwindled and the number of miners increased dramatically. The atmosphere of friendly camaraderie so prevalent a year or two earlier, had all but disappeared by 1850. Forty-niners who expected to make their fortunes in a matter of days found themselves digging month after month – year after year – with little to show for effort. Frustration and depression were rampant.

Out of desperation, many 49ers turned to poker and other forms of gambling in the hopes of stealing the quick fortunes that had eluded them in the rivers. When that didn't work, many turned to crime. The prisons, useless a few years earlier, were soon full. Hangings have become common – almost a fact.

49er John Bucroft

"I take this opportunity to write these few lines to you in the hope of finding you in good health. Charley and I are sentenced to be hanged at five for a theft. Give the best of me to Frank and Sam.

Many gave up on the dream and returned home to the east. Others stayed – just a year longer than they hoped. One more year and they would get richer. And there were occasional lucky strikes until the 1850s – just enough good news to encourage the masses to keep digging. Most failed every day, but they kept going – year after year. Depressed, disappointed, many would never return home to loved ones in the East – they would die in California, shattered by a dream that never came true.

Although the gold of the California Hills eventually ran out, the impact of the Gold Rush era endures. California was shaped by the adventurers who stayed – to form the idea that California is today: a place that accepts and nurtures risk-takers.

John Sutter never saw the opportunity for gold. He couldn't change his vision – and left the state. But as Sutter and those like him left, the new Californians came and kept coming. People who are able to adapt to constant changes; people who saw opportunities around every corner; people who yearned for a more exciting life and weren't afraid to catch it.

It was a dream that very few people ever realized – but it is a dream that lives on.

Internet and its marketing capabilities

On April 30, 1995, the government and organizations that built this system from scratch released it, and internet traffic was transferred to commercial networks. While the NSF continues to fund research and set guidelines for network providers, new infrastructure will be built and maintained by the descendants of the phone companies and other organizations. The scientists who were developing networking technology in the 1960s knew that what they were building would be much bigger than themselves; No one, however, could have predicted the explosion in internet access and interest in recent years.

The original designers didn't even think email was going to be something people would want. Business networks, students and even internet cafes are scrambling to

sign up and be part of a technology revolution. It is important for us to remember that the real revolution took place two decades ago – today

technology just follows the wave of yesteryear.

Internet marketing capabilities compare to the California Gold Rush.

Who was the REAL entrepreneur of the California gold rush?

The answer is Sam Brannan.

"The Gold Rush needed an accelerator, and Sam Brannan was the man. A San Francisco merchant, Brannan was a skillful hype maker. Ultimately, the Rush was the man. 39; gold

would make him the richest person in California – but Sam Brannan never mined for gold.

He had a different plan – a plan he implemented by running through the streets of San Francisco shouting about Marshall's discovery. For proof, Brannan

raised a bottle of gold dust. It was a master stroke that would spark the Gold Rush – and make Brannan rich.

Brannan fully understood the laws of supply and demand. His mad dash through San Francisco came right after he bought every pickaxe, pan and shovel in the area. A metal saucepan that sold for twenty cents a few days earlier was now available from Brannan for fifteen dollars. In just nine weeks, he made thirty-six thousand dollars. "

Who Was the REAL Internet Marketing Entrepreneur?

The answer is Bill Gates and Microsoft.

Bill Gates didn't choose to produce personal computers (gold in the gold rush). He chose to produce the best and most used software to make the

computers work (similar to Brannans selection axes and pots and spades).

And this is where the internet gold rush lies today – Professional software to help find the gold in internet marketing.

So the geniuses of the California Gold Rush and Internet Marketing Gold Rush were Sam Brannan and Bill Gates.

We at the Software R Us Club believe that a golden vein is in providing professional software to give everyone the opportunity to participate in the internet marketing gold rush.

And just remember … Sam Brannan and Bill Gates were right.


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