Estate Planning: Lessons Learned From Natina Reed

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Natina Reed died on October 27, 2012 and was best known as a member of girl group Blaque and as an actress in the famous cheerleader movie Bring It On. Reed died after being involved in a tragic car accident after being struck by a car as a pedestrian. She was thirty-two at the time of her death. There are many lessons in estate planning that can be learned from Natina Reed.

The biggest lesson is that there is no age to start thinking about planning a succession. Reed was in his early 30s, and like most people in their 20s and 30s, there's usually no need to start thinking about planning an estate or thinking that death is a possibility. A sudden fatal accident is not uncommon for many young people, and there shouldn't be any age to start considering consulting an estate planning lawyer anytime soon. Once you reach the age of 18 and become an adult, it's also time to start thinking about an estate plan. There are too many public examples of celebrities dying at a young age or before their time to be a lesson for the average person to think about a plan just in case.

Another lesson to be learned is that having an estate plan is absolutely essential if you have a child. Reed was the mother of a ten year old son when she passed away. Having a last will is the only way to formally appoint a potential successor guardian for a minor in many jurisdictions. There is no such important decision or parent as choosing who will take care of a child in the event that they are no longer alive. In the absence of a written document such as a will, a family court can step in and choose a guardian who may be different from the guardian the parent would have chosen. There may also be disagreements among family members over who should be the child's guardian, which could lead to arguments and arguments. A protracted public brawl in court with negative facts may result in no family member being chosen as a guardian and the child being raised by the state in a family of state. # 39; welcome. An estate plan is necessary to dispel doubt over such an important choice and to ensure that a child is in the care of the person chosen by the parent.


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